Predictions on the future of digitalized cultural heritage

Charlotte S.H. Jensen, webeditor at the National Museum, front runner in the Danish museum world when it comes to digitization of cultural heritage and exploring the potential of new media for museum mediation, and generously sharing her insights on her blog, is always a great source of inspiration (and surely deserves a trackback!). Like this post Digital kulturarv – hvad sker der i 2012, in which she points to possible upcoming trends for digital cultural mediation.

Her point about how cultural institutions should or will shift their focus from simply having a visible presence as institutions on social media platforms to engaging in interactions around themes and topics of interest where they occur resonates very well with my own outset. Perhaps my project could even nudge this development along?

Similaly, I agree that it would be great to see a ‘native’ mobile network for sharing and collaborating around cultural heritage. Which again reminded me to start using some of the tools that are already around; I’m now awaiting an invitation to the online pinboard Pinterest, which I’d been checking out before. Charlotte also shares links to Oink (couldn’t get my head around how that works), Miso (but it would seem that only makes sence if you have a telly, which I don’t)and Path (which presents itself maily as a tool forn sharing everyday life with your social network, but perhaps I’m just not seeing the potential for museums?), but I’ll focus on Pinterest at this point.

Charlotte goes on to cover objectification, cultural heritage in public spaces, crowdsourcing and Second Life (not sure about that, I have to say, but maybe it’s just because I had to leave my avatar stranded in a pool years ago when I couldn’t work out how to fly…) amongst other things – well worth a read!

2 comments
  1. I´m just truly honored by your kind recommendation of my post and blog! Thank you so much.Exciting to see how yours is comming along, and how your project evolves. Whishing you much success!
    … btw just to clarify: I believe more in virtual worlds as a phenomenon than in Second Life as a specific place. Especially after they´ve cancelled edu-discounts – but who really knows? Maybe we should rescue your drowning avatar and go exploring together some day🙂

    • rikkebaggesen said:

      Thank you for replying! Might just take you up on that offer😉. But to be honest, my memories of SL (and I must admit that this is the only virtual wold I have visited apart from Minnesota Zoo’s educational Wolfquest game, having never been much of a gamer) are rather uncomfortable, like having your drink spiked at a party and not being able to control your body and even struggling to speak, lost among strangers and still unsure what that guy with no pants on was doing to Polly (but then I guess I should be grateful that this happened in SL and not IRL). So for me, the problem was that I was so caught up with trying to control my avatar, that all I remember from that last, fatal visit to SMK’s virtual exhibition is my avatar in the water, and not the art that I came to see. Perhaps for others it’s easier to get past that initial barrier and experience the content and the social interactions rather than the technology, but still I think that barrier must be taken into consideration. Then again, who says that every museum experience should, or could, be designed for everyone? So yes, I think you are right that virtual worlds hold a very interesting potential for exploring cultural content ‘in context’.

      It’s really interesting to hear about your perspective and experience, though, both as a professional developer of digital museum mediation concepts, and as someone who personally loves to engage with cultural heritage through new media (this is how I picture you, correct me if I’m wrong or tell me to mind my own business if I’m overstepping the mark) – perhaps I could come and interview you someday?

      best, Rikke

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